The Humourous Adventure of Jump Jim Crow

Files

Woodcut on title-page of a dancing sailor wearing a hat and open jacket with raised hand.
https://s3.amazonaws.com/omeka-net/6428/archive/files/665574bec5bc708d9722d4df8641025a.pdf

Title

The Humourous Adventure of Jump Jim Crow

Publisher

Glasgow: Printed for the Booksellers

Date

1840-1850 ? per National Library of Scotland

Extent

8 pages
16 cm

Identifier

Is Part Of

Part of unbound collection (s0564b74)

Description

27 at bottom of title-page
Woodcut #03: Illustration on title-page of a dancing sailor wearing a hat, scarf, and open jacket

Type

ballads & songs

Abstract

"Jump Jim Crow" or "Jim Crow" is a song and dance from 1828 that was done in blackface by white minstrel performer Thomas Dartmouth (T. D.) "Daddy" Rice. The song is speculated to have been taken from Jim Crow (sometimes called Jim Cuff or Uncle Joe), a physically disabled enslaved African, who is variously claimed to have lived in St. Louis, Cincinnati, or Pittsburgh. The song became a 19th-century hit and Rice performed all over the United States as "Daddy Pops Jim Crow"."--Wikipedia

Subject

Chapbooks - Scotland - Glasgow
Black Race
Slavery
Wit and Humor

Source

Archival & Special Collections, University of Guelph Library, Guelph, Ontario

Is Referenced By

Scottish Chapbook Catalogue, Glasgow: NLS (2 copies), Glasgow

Format

JPEGs and PDF derived from master file, which was scanned from the original book in 24-bit color at 600 dpi in TIFF format using an Epson Expression 10000XL scanner.

Rights

In the public domain; For high quality reproductions, contact Archival & Special Collections, University of Guelph ca.519-824-4120, Ext 53413

Language

English

Citation

“The Humourous Adventure of Jump Jim Crow,” Scottish Chapbooks, accessed October 5, 2022, https://scottishchapbooks.lib.uoguelph.ca/items/show/443.
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